Spring 2024 Courses

Engage Europe in and beyond the classroom in spring 2024 with exciting learning programs from the Nanovic Institute!

Students interested in humanitarian work in a European context are encouraged to consider the Serving (in) Europeย internship program in Bulgaria, Italy, and Poland. Students interested in a diplomatic career and the ins and outs of European diplomacy are encouraged to consider the Diplomacy Scholars program. Finally, for those interested in the European Union, its policymaking process, and contemporary strengths and weaknesses, are encouraged to consider joining the Instituteโ€™s Model EU Delegation.

Students can use NOVO or class search to learn more and register for all spring 2024 EURO courses.

1 credit courses

Serving (in) Europe Pre-Departure Seminar
  • Instructor: Fr. Jim Lies
  • Monday 12:50-1:40 p.m.
  • EURO 33017

This course is required for all students accepted to the Serving (in) Europe program. Students will prepare for their internships by engaging with relevant literature on social justice and humanitarian issues in Europe as well as regular meetings with their Caritas host organization. Each student will engage in an eight week service internship at a faith-based charitable organization in Europe. The locations include Bulgaria, Italy, Poland, and Slovakia. This course will meet once each week for a short lecture and discussion which will enable them to consider what they are likely to encounter, and to learn about each of the sites where they will serve. The course will provide an examination of Catholic Social Teaching as a way to approach the world, especially those living on the peripheries.

Model European Union
  • Instructors: Abigail Lewis and Anna Dolezal
  • Thursday 3:30-4:20 p.m.
  • EURO 30006

This course will prepare students to participate in the Midwest Model EU simulation hosted by Indiana University, Bloomington. Through class meetings, assigned readings, and a final written "Draft Directive" to be used during the simulation, students will gain a practical understanding of the purpose and functioning of European institutions and European politics. In addition to familiarity with current EU policy issues and current events, students will gain an understanding of and experience with executing member states' policy positions, various EU decision making processes, and EU policy creation. The course culminates with students' participation in Midwest Model EU at the beginning of April, representing European state governments in intergovernmental policy creation.

Europe through Film: On the Margins
  • Instructor: Ricky Herbst
  • Thursday 6:30 - 9:00 p.m.
  • EURO 30102

Film remains an excellent window into various cultures, but we have to analyze why certain windows (don't) exist, what they allow us to (not) see, and the nature of that access. One way to foreground that conversation is through looking at films by, for, and/or about marginalized populations in Europe, which will be the focus of the films, readings, and discussions in this course. With ties to the Nanovic Institute's reoccurring film series, the content of this course will zone in on the relationship between contemporary European cinema and the European ideas and realities it finds compelling in terms of social and imaginative power and to whom it is granted. The course will include some history of cinema, but emphasis will be laid on using cinema as a way of stimulating questions about the nature of Europe today. Open to students of all years and majors.

3.0 credit courses

Mobilizing Memory: Politics of Memory in Modern Europe
  • Instructor: Abigail Lewis
  • Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 p.m.
  • EURO 30217

This class analyzes the politics and cultures of remembrance in Europe from the late nineteenth century to today. Taking examples such as the politicization of Holocaust memory in Europe or the grassroots removal of monuments in Britain as points of departure, students will learn about processes of remembering and forgetting, and how memories of the past have shaped European identity and culture in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will pay particular attention to the mobilization and commemoration of Europeโ€™s traumatic pasts, including the World Wars, imperialism and decolonization, the Cold War, and histories of genocide, to investigate how Europeans have remembered these difficult histories and how these memories have shifted over time. We will look not only at how the traumatic past is represented today; but how memory work was enacted at the time and how Europeans have fought to revise these representations and demand new recognition of alternative visions of the past. In its focus on memory, broadly defined, this course will deeply explore how representations of the past have shaped European identity, culture, and politics both at the time and today.

In its focus on memory and memorialization, this class also attends to the visuality and material culture of history and historical research. Students will learn to read visual and material sources as sources akin to political tracts, diaries, and memoirs. We will engage with sources including photo albums, monuments, memorials, museum spaces, memorial landscapes, film, cultural kitsch, and art all as critical primary sources to understanding the production and circulation of memory. We will read foundational texts on collective memory and remembrance to understand how scholars and theorists have defined and conceptualized memory. Students will also conduct an original research project on a topic of their choosing by exploring a case study of memory work or collective memory in the context of Modern Europe.

Deep Dive into Diplomacy
  • Instructor: Clemens Sedmak
  • Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 a.m.
  • EURO 30007

Diplomacy is a way of doing politics: the established method of negotiating inter-state relations and of influencing the decisions and behavior of foreign governments and peoples through presence and engagement, dialogue, and negotiation. Diplomats are committed to their home country, but also their host country and the bigger picture of the common good. Contributors to peace building and peacekeeping, diplomats, serve political purposes through cultural engagement. In this way, they contribute to "integral human development" in the design of international relations. The Nanovic Institute invites undergraduate students to join our Diplomacy Scholars Program through Deep Dive Into Diplomacy. This course will examine diplomacy as a tool in European relations and affairs while providing students the opportunity to hone diplomatic skills such as conflict mediation, judgement and decision making, intercultural competencies, and written and oral communication. Students will learn from present and former diplomats about the diplomatic way of life and participate in a number of simulations and activities beyond the classroom.

Societal Challenges in Europe: Global Responses to a Changing World
  • Instructor: Marco Grazzi
  • Monday and Wednesday 2:00-3:15 p.m.
  • EURO 30219, LLRO 30219

Economic policy affects us all. That is why the best approach to solving the challenges that arise from it is an interdisciplinary one. From political science to economics to global affairs, each discipline offers something to this conversation that transcends national borders. Traditionally, they have operated in silos, but this course seeks to bring them together to address six multidisciplinary challenges facing contemporary society, including:

  • ๐“๐ก๐ž (๐ฌ๐ฎ๐ฉ๐ฉ๐จ๐ฌ๐ž๐) ๐ญ๐ซ๐š๐๐ž-๐จ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ ๐ž๐Ÿ๐Ÿ๐ข๐œ๐ข๐ž๐ง๐œ๐ฒ/๐ข๐ง๐ž๐ช๐ฎ๐š๐ฅ๐ข๐ญ๐ฒโ€” How do societies balance the need for efficiency with a view to preventing or reducing inequality? Is this perceived trade-off actually a trade-off?
  • ๐Š๐ง๐จ๐ฐ๐ฅ๐ž๐๐ ๐ž, ๐ข๐ง๐ฌ๐ญ๐ข๐ญ๐ฎ๐ญ๐ข๐จ๐ง๐ฌ, ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ข๐ง๐œ๐ž๐ง๐ญ๐ข๐ฏ๐ž๐ฌ ๐Ÿ๐จ๐ซ ๐ข๐ง๐œ๐ฅ๐ฎ๐ฌ๐ข๐ฏ๐ž ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ฌ๐ฎ๐ฌ๐ญ๐š๐ข๐ง๐š๐›๐ฅ๐ž ๐ ๐ซ๐จ๐ฐ๐ญ๐ก: ๐š ๐ฆ๐ข๐ฌ๐ฌ๐ข๐จ๐ง-๐จ๐ซ๐ข๐ž๐ง๐ญ๐ž๐ ๐š๐ฉ๐ฉ๐ซ๐จ๐š๐œ๐ก โ€” What is the root of innovation? How do external motivators and intrinsic motivations interact to stimulate growth? What is the role of government in these questions, and how has the European Union approached them?
  • ๐†๐ซ๐ž๐ž๐ง ๐ญ๐ž๐œ๐ก๐ง๐จ๐ฅ๐จ๐ ๐ฒ ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ข๐ง๐ง๐จ๐ฏ๐š๐ญ๐ข๐จ๐ง โ€” How can we protect the environment and ensure a thriving ecosystem for generations to come while meeting our socio-economic needs? What is the relationship between sustainability and innovation in todayโ€™s rapidly evolving green tech market?
  • ๐‘๐จ๐›๐จ๐ญ๐ฌ, ๐€๐ˆ, ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐Ÿ๐ฎ๐ญ๐ฎ๐ซ๐ž ๐จ๐Ÿ ๐ฐ๐จ๐ซ๐ค โ€” To what extent will the rapid iteration of AI technology affect the world of work? How is the deployment of generative AI unique compared to previous automation movements?
  • ๐†๐ฅ๐จ๐›๐š๐ฅ ๐ฏ๐š๐ฅ๐ฎ๐ž ๐œ๐ก๐š๐ข๐ง๐ฌ, ๐ญ๐ซ๐š๐๐ž, ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ฉ๐ซ๐จ๐๐ฎ๐œ๐ญ๐ข๐ฏ๐ข๐ญ๐ฒ ๐๐ฒ๐ง๐š๐ฆ๐ข๐œ๐ฌ โ€” How do nations and businesses fit a value chain that occurs across borders?
  • ๐…๐ข๐ซ๐ฆ ๐ก๐ž๐ญ๐ž๐ซ๐จ๐ ๐ž๐ง๐ž๐ข๐ญ๐ฒ, ๐ฉ๐ซ๐จ๐๐ฎ๐œ๐ญ๐ข๐ฏ๐ข๐ญ๐ฒ, ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ฐ๐š๐ ๐ž ๐ ๐š๐ฉ โ€” How does the growing wage gap, even across firms in the same sector, relate to questions of inequality?

Students will learn about how the European Union is addressing each challenge, as well as offering space for reflection on global responses. Students will come away from the course with a strong understanding of how Europe and the world see each topic and the implications for future policy decisions, ethics, and diplomacy.

Europe Confronts the Refugee Challenge
  • Instructor: William Donahue
  • Monday and Wednesday 5:05-6:20 p.m.
  • EURO 33205

This course provides an opportunity to explore various aspects of Germany's current policies toward refugees and immigrants within the larger context of European and UN practice. It includes a one-week trip to Berlin during spring break (March 9-17, 2024). In Berlin, the group will meet with federal, state and local governmental officials, civil society groups, and representatives of international organizations. The issues to be explored include: Germany's policies toward asylum-seekers, the relationship between these policies and the European Union, policies to integrate refugees and migrants into German society, and the political impact of these policies. The on-site Berlin seminar is designed to assess the efficacy of current policies, and identify best policy practices that might apply elsewhere. N.B. Enrollment is via competitive essay application through the Nanovic Institute, which funds this course. See the Nanovic Submittable Portal for further guidelines on the essay. The application deadline is Friday, November 3, 2023.

Nothing is True and Everything is Possible: Politics, Media & War in Russia
  • Instructor: Sean Griffin
  • Monday and Wednesday 3:30-4:45 p.m.
  • EURO 33101, RU 33101

In 1987, the Soviet Union was the largest political entity on the planet. Four years later, it had vanished from the map entirely. In this interdisciplinary course, you will learn about the โ€˜new Russiaโ€™ that has emerged in the three decades since this stunning collapse. Drawing on an array of resources in English translation, you will explore the politics, media, and culture of the post-Soviet period: from the lawless years of the โ€œwild 90sโ€ under Boris Yeltsin to the return of totalitarianism under Vladimir Putin and his brutal invasion of Ukraine. In so doing, your study of contemporary Russia will lead us to discuss some of the most pressing questions in global politics today. What is the nature of truth and power in Putinโ€™s dystopian propaganda state? Should the current leadership in Russia be described as a fascist regime or neo-Soviet? And, perhaps most importantly, how did Russiaโ€™s democratic experiment ultimately end with the launch of the largest war in Europe since 1945โ€”and what lessons might this failure hold for America and the rest of the world?

Germany and the Environment
  • Instructor: Tobias Boes
  • Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
  • EURO 30112, GE 30112

Germany is globally recognized as a leader in the fields of renewable energy, sustainable development, and environmental protection. But how did this come about? In this course, we will examine the roles that culture and history play in shaping human attitudes towards the environment. Our case studies will range over two centuries, from damming projects in the Rhine valley at the start of the nineteenth century to the Chernobyl nuclear disaster at the end of the twentieth. We will study novels, films, and philosophical essays alongside works by leading environmental historians. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a richer understanding of German environmentalism that also includes an awareness of its dark sides, such as the role that nature conservancy played within Nazi ideology.

Germans in the Americas
  • Instructor: CJ Jones
  • Monday and Wednesday 3:30 p.m.-4:45 p.m.
  • EURO 33027, GE 33027

As soon as Europeans began exploring and colonizing the so-called New World, Germans were there. Germans came to the Americas as conquistadors, settlers, refugees, missionaries, and merchants. The German colony in Venezuela was disastrously short-lived, but Germans came to play a significant role in the colonization of North America through the settlement of Pennsylvania. This course introduces students to the varieties of German presence in the Americas from the 16th to the 18th centuries. Topics may include the colonization and conquest of South America, German interactions with Indigenous communities, German missionaries to the enslaved peoples in the Caribbean, the role of German immigrants in early anti-slavery and pacifist movements, and the origin and afterlife of the language called Pennsylvania Dutch. This course will be taught in English.

The French Revolution and Napoleon
  • Instructor: Katie Jarvis
  • Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 p.m.
  • EURO 30453, HIST 45453

The French Revolution created a turning point in history by paving the way for modern politics and society. Napoleon's empire, on the other hand, toppled some of the oldest European monarchies and shook up the international status quo. During two and a half turbulent decades, the French destroyed feudalism, created a constitutional monarchy, founded a republic, and built an empire that stretched across the continent. Our course will focus on how the French reinvented the social, cultural, and political dimensions of their world from the 1780s to 1815. We will ask major questions such as: What were the origins of the French Revolution? How did the revolutionaries recreate political culture and social structures? Why did the Revolution radicalize at first but eventually slide into an empire? Was Napoleon the "son of the Revolution" or did he betray its major goals? Of special note, our course includes a 4-week "Reacting to the Past" game that allows you to engage in history from a completely new perspective. During this historical role-playing unit, you will become a specific member of the National Assembly or the Parisian crowd. To win, you must pass a constitution favorable to your position while wrestling "with the threat of foreign invasion, political and religious struggles, and questions of liberty and citizenship." Although we may change the course of history within the unit, you will root your arguments in resources available to your historical persona: primary documents, political treatises, inspiring speeches, secret collaborations, and "current" events.

Humors to Hysteria: Human and Political Bodies in European History, 1517-1918
  • Instructor: Katie Jarvis
  • Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 p.m.
  • EURO 30456, HIST 30456

Between the early rumblings of the Reformations and the last cannon shot of World War I, Europeans profoundly changed how they conceptualized bodies as experience and metaphors. During these four centuries, Europeans grounded the ways in which they interacted with each other and the world in bodily imaginings. On an individual level, the living, human body provided a means of accessing and understanding the material or spiritual world. On a collective scale, the physical body, its adornments, and its gestures provided markers that Europeans used to fracture society along axes of gender, sexuality, class, race, mental aptitude, and even sacrality. Drawing in part from their myriad imaginings of the human body, Europeans constructed metaphorical political bodies. The body politic assumed diverse forms spanning from divine right monarchs to revolutionary republics to modern nation states. Our course will lay bare the human body as culturally constructed, while fleshing out how Europeans' evolving visions affected political imaginings.

Catholicism Confronts Modernity
  • Instructor: Sarah Shortall
  • Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 p.m.
  • EURO 30554, HIST 30554

This class introduces students to the history of Catholicism since the French Revolution, focusing primarily on Europe. It examines how Catholics confronted the challenges of modernity - from liberal democracy and nationalism; to capitalism and modern science; to new political ideologies such as fascism and communism. We will explore not only how these encounters transformed the Church, but also how Catholicism itself has shaped modern politics and culture. The first part of the course begins with the nineteenth-century - culture wars - between Catholics and anticlerical forces, focusing in particular on popular devotions like the Lourdes pilgrimage and the perceived "feminization" of religion. The second part of the course shifts to the twentieth century and examines the relationship between the Catholic Church and modern political ideologies such as nationalism, fascism, communism, and democracy. The third part of the course explores modern Catholic art, literature, and film. Finally, we close by examining the more recent history of Catholicism since the transformative changes of the Second Vatican Council in the 1960s. Readings are drawn from a range of primary sources - including novels, speeches, Church documents, works of art, and films - as well as secondary sources by historians.

Catholicism and Empire
  • Instructor: Sarah Shortall
  • Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
  • EURO 33206, HIST 35557

This course explores the historical relationship between the Catholic Church and the rise and fall of European overseas empires since the sixteenth century. We will consider how Catholic missionaries both reinforced and resisted colonial power structures; how the Church made sense of racial, religious, and cultural differences in its efforts to evangelize colonial subjects; how African, Asian, and Latin American Catholics developed their own distinctive spiritual practices; and how Catholics in both Europe and its former colonies grappled with the challenge of decolonization and how to undo the legacies of colonialism within the Church itself. Readings will be drawn from a range of sources, including missionary diaries and manuals, memoirs, artwork, papal encyclicals, films, novels, works of theology, and historical scholarship.

Poetry and Protest: Irish poetry in the twentieth and twenty-first century
  • Instructor: Cliona Ni Riordain
  • Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 a.m.
  • EURO 30128, IRLL 30128

This course will examine Irish poetry, written both in Irish and English, through the prism of protest. A translation into English will be available for the poems in Irish. We will explore the public role occupied by the poet in Ireland and the concurrent anxieties and responsibilities of the role. The course will examine the formal prosodic dimensions of the poems and students will also learn about the historical circumstances in which the poems were produced. The course will include the work of WB Yeats, PH Pearse, JM Plunkett, Seรกn ร“ Rรญordรกin, Mรกirtรญn ร“ Direรกin, John Montague, Seamus Heaney, Mรกire Mhac an tSaoi, Eavan Boland, Nuala Nรญ Dhomhnaill, Paul Durcan, Paula Meehan, Liam ร“ Muirthile, Eilรฉan Nรญ Chuilleanรกin, Michael Oโ€™Loughlin, Aifric MacAodha, Thomas McCarthy, Ciaran Carson, Theo Dorgan, Gerry Murphy, Gail McConnell, Rachael Hegarty, Trevor Joyce . The course will be delivered in a chronological and thematic fashion. Learning outcomes: Knowledge and appreciation of contemporary Irish Poetry

Remembering Ireland: Public Memory and Private Memory in Memoir, Film and Song
  • Instructor: Cliona Ni Riordain
  • Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 p.m.
  • EURO 30130, IRLL 30129

This course looks at the way in which Ireland is remembered. It will do so by looking at different sources of memorialisation. The course will examine the memory of the diaspora and the representation of Ireland through songs and memoirs. It will be anchored both in the question of memory studies, drawing on the work of philosophers such as Paul Ricoeur. It will explore what gets remembered in times of commemoration of historical events, such as the 1916 Rising or the Great Famine. Students will also examine the notion of nostalgia. Other sources that will be studied in the course will be photographs, films, paintings and statues.

Slรกinte?: Alcohol(ism) & the Irish
  • Instructor: Sarah McKibben
  • Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
  • EURO 30314, IRLL 30314

A clichรฉ, a painful truth, an old story, a new oneโ€”this course explores alcohol and alcoholism in Irish literature, Irish society and Irishness, examining how alcohol infuses the stories Irish people tell and those told about them, and asking what happens if we take alcohol(ism) seriously as a framework and topic of analysis. We will think about the romance and conviviality of drink and drinking, pubs and wakes and more; and counterposed crusades against drinking (by Father Mathew and others), as well as the unromantic and destructive dimension so central to recent writing. We will think about alcohol(ism) in relation to political authority and nationalism, as well as in relation to colonial resistance, recalcitrance and recovery. We will ask how this "inheritance" travels into Irish America, and even to this campus, asking what legacies are being lived out, and why, and what we make of that. The course will feature a diverse set of texts across a span of Irish literary tradition, including medieval and contemporary, fiction and memoir, poetry and prose, verbal, visual and musical media. On the way students will work on their speaking, analytical and writing skills. Course work will include short writing assignments and analytical papers, a presentation, and a creative assignment.

The Eastern Churches: Theology and History
  • Instructor: Yury Avvakumov
  • Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 p.m.
  • EURO 20249, THEO 20249

Eastern Christians and their Churches are an indispensable part of global Christianity that sheds light on its origins, its basic theological tenets, its achievements and its historical failures, dilemmas and challenges. The course provides an overview of the variety of Eastern-rite Christian Churches belonging to the different cultural traditions of Eastern Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean. The students will be introduced to the theological views and liturgical life of Eastern-rite Christians, i.e., Orthodox, Oriental and Eastern Catholic, and their fascinating history. We shall explore the Byzantine rite Churches in more detail, and discuss the challenges their theology and history present to contemporary world and international relations. Special attention will be given to Slavic Christianity and particularly to Russian and Ukrainian religious history. Reflections on the diversity of Eastern Christian traditions lead to insights into theological, moral, and cultural issues of particular importance for today such as ecumenism, war and non-violence, Christian Churches and totalitarianism, the role of liturgy and ritual in modern culture.

From the "Sea in the Middle": Medieval Mediterranean's Stories
  • Instructor: Nicola Esposito
  • Monday and Wednesday 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
  • EURO 20650, LLRO 20650

In the intricate and interconnected society of the Late Middle Ages in the Mediterranean Basin (12th-15th Centuries), the short story emerged as a dominant literary genre, transcending cultural and geographic boundaries. The Mediterraneanโ€™s bustling commercial networks served as a conduit for stories, knowledge, and people, bridging distant shores.

During this era, Italians held sway as the Mediterraneanโ€™s foremost commercial and naval power, a dominance reflected in the multitude of short story collections written from the 12th to the 14th Centuries. Figures like Giovanni Boccaccio, Franco Sacchetti, and Giovanni Sercambi skillfully portrayed the sociological, geographical, historical, and psychological intricacies of this cultural crossroads.

The short story explored diverse themes, including courtly love, the Crusades, the interplay of the three Monotheistic Religions, class struggles, varied perspectives on womenโ€™s roles from Spain to the Arabic domains, and encounters between different cultures. This genre provided a window into the eraโ€™s multifaceted facets.

This course aims to delve into the historical tapestry of the multiethnic and multicultural Italian peninsula during the Late Middle Ages. Through Italian short stories, we will explore its cultures, geography, and traditions, gaining insights into this captivating period.

Modernist Italy: Decadence, Avant-garde, and the Crisis of the Self
  • Instructor: Nicola Esposito
  • Monday and Wednesday 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
  • EURO 40370, ROIT 40370

The passage from the nineteenth to the twentieth century was a period of great hope but also of great anxiety. While nobody could predict the coming of the First World War, pre-apocalyptic restlessness dominated culture, especially in the young nation of Italy. Modernity promised ever greater improvements in living conditions, but it also laid bare its contradictions: social inequalities, political conflict and polarization, and the abyss of existential angst, which afflicted so many and so much.

From fiction to poetry, from theater to visual arts, we will study how the great Italian authors of this period like Nobel Prize winner Luigi Pirandello, Gabriele dโ€™Annunzio, Filippo T. Marinetti and the Italian Futurists bore witness to the transformations of the modern era. Some prospected a societal collapse and yearned for a rebirth accelerated by avant-garde aesthetics, while others escaped into individualistic introspection for personal and spiritual actualization.

We will explore the tensions of Italian literary Modernism, which live on to this day: progressivism with reactionism, nationalism with cosmopolitanism, regionalism with immigration, capitalism with socialism, pacifism with warmongering, religion with secularization and existentialism, to see why the turn of the century left an indelible mark for the centuries to come.

Taught in Italian.

Modern Italian Literature and Culture
  • Instructor: Charles Leavitt
  • Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 p.m.
  • EURO 30712, ROIT 30712

Renowned for its rich past but full of contradictions that persist to the present day, Italy has one of the most fascinating histories and abundant cultures in the modern world. This course provides a unique perspective onto Italian modernity by exploring the wealth of Italyโ€™s modern and contemporary cultural production. We will focus on key issues that unveil the unique โ€œspiritโ€ of modern Italy, such as the weight of the past, the tension between political realism and idealism, the recurrence of social and political crises, immigration, revolution, and youth culture. We will investigate how issues of gender, class, race, identity, and faith have shaped Italian literature, film, and theatre in the modern age. Through the study of texts, films, and other media, the course seeks to understand the development of modern Italy and its future trajectory. Authors studied will include Dario Fo, Natalia Ginzburg, Eugenio Montale, Elsa Morante, Anna Maria Ortese, Luigi Pirandello, Igiaba Scego, and Elio Vittorini. Taught in Italian. Pre-requisite: ROIT 20202 or 20215 or equivalent. LANG - College Language Req, LIT - Univ.Req. Literature, MESE - European Studies Course. Ways of Knowing Core designations: Advanced Language and Culture; Fine Arts and Literature.

Taught in Italian.

Introductory Ukrainian
  • Instructor: Tetyana Shlikhar
  • Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 p.m.
  • EURO 30505, RU 10505

This is an introductory course for complete beginners in Ukrainian. The course aims to provide a solid foundation in four major communicative skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will learn to communicate effectively across cultural and linguistic boundaries while developing knowledge of the Ukrainian language, traditions, and culture. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of basic structures, vocabulary, and sound systems. Students will be encouraged to use their language skills to communicate and interact in a variety of situations and contexts. Cultural awareness will be enhanced with authentic audio-visual materials, literary texts, and cultural artifacts. By the end of the course, students will be able to read short original Ukrainian texts and communicate on everyday topics. No prerequisite.

Business French
  • Instructor: Anne Schaefer
  • Monday and Wednesday 2:00-3:15 p.m.
  • EURO 20400, ROFR 20400

This course will focus on the practical use of French in an international professional environment. Emphasis will be placed on developing communicative skills and cultural knowledge necessary for the professional world. Students will review relevant structures and vocabulary needed to accomplish specific tasks and skills necessary in a broadly-defined formal professional setting.

The Priest in French Culture
  • Instructor: Fr. Greg Haake
  • Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
  • EURO 30605, LLRO 30605

From country pastor to cathedral villain, from merciful bishop to weaselly lecher, the image of the Roman Catholic priest in French culture is nothing if not versatile. But what purpose does that versatility serve? Is the image of the priest simply all things to all people as a matter of utility, an easy target - for good or for ill - that provides to authors, artists, or directors a shortcut to a good laugh or to a character that their audience will love to hate? This course will explore the image of the priest in France from the Middle Ages to the present day in its varied manifestations in literature, film, and art. We will examine what the broad spectrum of representations reveals about the state of the French Church at any given moment in history, about the theology of the priesthood, or about clericalism and anticlericalism in a political or social context. In a moment when the meaning of the priesthood in the Catholic Church and beyond continues to be contested, a study of the French context will yield a deeper understanding of the priest and his role as an embodiment of the Church and its authority. Taught in English, with course materials available both in English and the original French.

From Whispers to Worldviews: Gossip and the Social Network in Nineteenth-Century France
  • Instructor: Madison Mainwaring
  • Monday and Wednesday 2:00-3:15 p.m.
  • EURO 40715, ROFR 40715

The nineteenth century saw the rise of print media and professional institutions. Old-fashioned whisper networks came to be viewed suspiciously as a dangerous, โ€œfeminineโ€ pastime for those without lives of their own. Yet the enduring popularity of gossipโ€”in society columns, romans-ร - clef, communal laundry rooms, and political caricaturesโ€”meant that informal social networks thrived, fueled by a heightened interest in the private lives of famous people. The learning goals of this class extend beyond those of textual analysis and the researched argument to media literacy. Following several scandals across a variety of sources, we will study how information was transmitted via different genres, spaces, and voices in nineteenth-century France, looking at a range of texts from broadsheets to Offenbach operettas. While reinforcing social mores, gossip also provided a means of resistance to the status quo, a way for the marginalized to reframe official narratives and point to the humanity shared across classes and identities. Taught in French.

Prizes, Publishers, Plagiarism: Decolonizing Literary Legacies in French
  • Instructor: Alison Rice
  • Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 p.m.
  • EURO 40940, ROFR 40940

This course focuses on literary works in French that have received illustrious prizes, from the Nobel Prize to the Prix Goncourt, and it examines questions related to the prestige of publishing houses and the role of marketing techniques meant to package and sell books alongside questions of influence and imitation, and of possible accusations of plagiarism. The courseโ€™s tripartite emphasis on the ways in which authors and their textual creations are celebrated, circulated, and questioned is complemented by an analysis of how these award-winning attempts to decolonize literature in French constitute a contemporary quest with profound historical and intertextual resonances. We read literary works of a great variety, including novels by Nobel prizewinning authors Annie Ernaux (the first Frenchwoman ever to win this award in 2022) and Jean-Marie Le Clรฉzio, Goncourt prizewinning authors Mohamed Mbougar Sarr (the first Sub-Saharan African to win this award in 2021) and Leรฏla Slimani, as well as works by other writers who are caught up in telling striking stories that involve intersecting understandings of the complexities of race, class, and gender that have too often been missing from the literary landscape in French.

Migrants and Mobility in an Age of Mass Movement
  • Instructor: Rose Luminello
  • Monday and Wednesday 12:30-1:45 p.m.
  • EURO 30141, GLAF 30141

This course examines the origins and development of contemporary opinions and policies concerning migrations and migrants. It does so by looking backward to the age when transoceanic mobility became more frequent and increasingly more accessible before moving forward to our own times. It is the central claim of this course that it is impossible to understand what drives policy today without first surveying the changing ideas of migration and the movement of people over time. It will therefore take students through the history of migration in the modern world, as well as studying the migrant journey, connections to home, the process and difficulties of assimilation and community creation, and the problems or opportunities that could arise for migrants from characteristics like race, religion, ethnicity, or language. Also considered will be the complex relationship between colonization and migration. In the process, Migrants and Mobility will also examine how different societies place value judgments upon migrants and analyze how and why migration/migrants have been categorized as โ€œgoodโ€ or โ€œbadโ€ over time. Students will also encounter and consider the effects of growing urbanization and industrialization, changing demography and global trade patterns, and, morerecently, the impact of climate change. Migrants and Mobility will be primarily seminar based, placing a premium on participation and analytical discussion.

Graduate courses

Deep Dive into Diplomacy ย 
  • Instructor: Clemens Sedmak
  • Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 a.m.
  • EURO 60007 (graduate section)

Diplomacy is a way of doing politics: the established method of negotiating inter-state relations and of influencing the decisions and behavior of foreign governments and peoples through presence and engagement, dialogue, and negotiation. Diplomats are committed to their home country, but also their host country and the bigger picture of the common good. Contributors to peace building and peacekeeping, diplomats, serve political purposes through cultural engagement. In this way, they contribute to "integral human development" in the design of international relations. The Nanovic Institute invites undergraduate students to join our Diplomacy Scholars Program through Deep Dive Into Diplomacy. This course will examine diplomacy as a tool in European relations and affairs while providing students the opportunity to hone diplomatic skills such as conflict mediation, judgement and decision making, intercultural competencies, and written and oral communication. Students will learn from present and former diplomats about the diplomatic way of life and participate in a number of simulations and activities beyond the classroom.

Europe Confronts the Refugee Challenge ย 
  • Instructor: William Donahue
  • Monday and Wednesday 5:05-6:20 p.m.
  • EURO 63205 (graduate section)

This course provides an opportunity to explore various aspects of Germany's current policies toward refugees and immigrants within the larger context of European and UN practice. It includes a one-week trip to Berlin during spring break (March 9-17, 2024). In Berlin, the group will meet with federal, state and local governmental officials, civil society groups, and representatives of international organizations. The issues to be explored include: Germany's policies toward asylum-seekers, the relationship between these policies and the European Union, policies to integrate refugees and migrants into German society, and the political impact of these policies. The on-site Berlin seminar is designed to assess the efficacy of current policies, and identify best policy practices that might apply elsewhere. N.B. Enrollment is via competitive essay application through the Nanovic Institute, which funds this course. See the Nanovic Submittable Portal for further guidelines on the essay. The application deadline is Friday, November 3, 2023.