The Spirit of '68 Film Series: GIVE ME FUTURE

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Location: Browning Cinema

About the Film

Documentary, 88 minutes, English and Spanish with subtitles, 2016

Introduced by Anthony Monta, associate director of the Nanovic Institute for European Studies

The film which premiered at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival documents "Cuba's burgeoning youth movement, fusing exhilarating performance footage with authentic stories of cultural and political shifts in a country on the precipice of change."

2015 was a landmark year for electronic dancehall superband Major Lazer. After topping the EDM charts with their international hit single “Lean On,” the band continued its world tour, mounting elaborate shows not only in traditional destinations, but also in more challenging locations around the globe. Fueled by a dream of “making the world smaller by making the party bigger,” the group furthered their mission of peace through music with a free concert in the unlikeliest of venues—downtown Havana, Cuba, where no American band at the height of their fame had previously been allowed to perform. Without knowing whether anyone in the country even knew who they were, they hoped to reach a potential crowd of 50,000. After half a million exuberant fans showed up, music history was made on a massive scale.

In what began as a concert film intended to document this groundbreaking event, director Austin Peters turns the camera on a burgeoning youth movement, fusing exhilarating performance footage with authentic stories of cultural and political shifts in a country on the precipice of change.


Film Series: The Spirit of '68

In all respects, 1968 was a watershed year on both sides of the Atlantic. Social and political divisions exploded as a result of unresolved domestic conflicts and military actions abroad. Everywhere the boundaries of conventional behavior and social mores were tested.

At the same time, and in the context of these conflicts, 1968 was a year of remarkable creativity in the arts. These developments went hand in hand with innovative experiments in life-styles and community living, an expanded awareness of environmental dangers, and new forms of democratic participation.

Like the other arts, cinema captured the spirit of the times. Perhaps no better focus for attention came from music, where live concerts became vehicles for exploring all the innovation that the spirit of '68 had to offer.


Tickets

All films will be shown in the THX-certified Browning Cinema at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.

Tickets are $7 for adults, $6 for senior citizens, $5 for ND/SMC faculty/staff, and $4 for students/children at 574-631-2800, or visit performingarts.nd.edu

Free tickets are available while supplies last at the Nanovic Institute for European Studies (1060 Nanovic Hall).