News » Graduate Student Spotlights

Predicated Grades: A Predicted Fiasco?

Predicated Grades: A Predicted Fiasco?

In Europe, the end of exams marks the beginning of summer and of childhood, and results day marks the end of summer and the beginning of adult life, with students finding out if they will be going on to university. COVID-19 threw this usual rite of passage into chaos this year,...

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Accompanying Refugees in Italy During a Pandemic

Accompanying Refugees in Italy During a Pandemic

This article is the twenty-third in a series of blog posts published by the Keough School of Global Affairs. Dignity and Development provides in-depth analysis of global challenges through the lens of integral human development.  The global coronavirus pandemic has tested and reshaped societies around the globe, including national and international refugee support systems....

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A Message for the MGA Class of 2020

A Message for the MGA Class of 2020

Dear friends, Let us keep it simple; it is as simple as that: We need artisans of a new humanity. For my wife’s birthday, our boys decided to surprise her by building a raised garden bed. A raised garden bed, as you know, is practical for aging gardeners, is beautiful...

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Nanovic Graduate Fellow Book Review: Article 353

Nanovic Graduate Fellow Book Review: Article 353

Early in 2019, The New York Times published a “Globetrotting” list of books from a variety of genres and countries. Drawing from works originally published in and about every inhabited continent, the list presented an assortment of novels, memoirs, nonfiction works, and collections of poetry or short stories that drew critical acclaim in...

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Graduate Student Fellow Book Review: Good Will Come From the Sea

Graduate Student Fellow Book Review: Good Will Come From the Sea

Early in 2019, The New York Times published a “Globetrotting” list of books from a variety of genres and countries. Drawing from works originally published in and about every inhabited continent, the list presented an assortment of novels, memoirs, nonfiction works, and collections of poetry or short stories that drew critical...

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Nanovic Grant Recipient Receives Research Fulbright

Nanovic Grant Recipient Receives Research Fulbright

Steven Lemke, a past recipient of the Snider Family Endowment for Excellence in European Studies, has been awarded a 2019-2020 U.S. Fulbright Open Study/Research Fellowship to Slovakia to explore the relationship between communal architecture and identity. Lemke, a 2019 Master of Fine Arts graduate in the Department of Art, Art History,...

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The Bewilderment Around Brexit

The Bewilderment Around Brexit

Ed. As of the time of this writing (4/1/2019), the Parliament of the United Kingdom is engaged in a second round of 'indicative votes' regarding alternatives to the withdrawal agreement negotiated between the government of Theresa May and representatives of the European Council. The Institute convened a panel discussion of this issue in...

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Developing Linguistic, Cultural, and Research Groundwork in Cologne, Germany

Developing Linguistic, Cultural, and Research Groundwork in Cologne, Germany

During a four-week summer intensive German course in Cologne, Germany, Paul Wheatley, a doctoral student in Christianity and Judaism in Antiquity developed crucial proficiency in German language and cultural understanding. The trip also provided opportunities for essential future research in German as well as several relationships with German scholars, professors,...

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Graduate Student Spotlight: Daniel Contreras

Graduate Student Spotlight: Daniel Contreras

What does Thomas Aquinas have to do with Greece? With Nanovic Institute support, Daniel Contreras (PhD student, Medieval Studies) recently traveled to Athens to participate in the annual Symposium Thomisticum, with this year’s focus being the influence that ancient and medieval Greek authors had on Aquinas, as well as Aquinas’...

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McDowell Untangles a Cold-War Litigation Saga

McDowell Untangles a Cold-War Litigation Saga

During the 1950s, the U.S. made the highly unusual decision to sue the Soviet Union six times in international court. With a Nanovic research grant, Steven McDowell (Ph.D. candidate, Political Science) visited the National Archives and discovered a treasure trove of documents that help shed light on the U.S.'s baffling legal...

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Perfecting Medieval Chant in Paris

Perfecting Medieval Chant in Paris

Two of the best teachers of medieval music and chant currently work at the Sorbonne University in Paris. With the support of the Nanovic Institute, Victoria Fraser had the opportunity to study, hear, and coach pieces of the repertoire with them privately.

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Notre Dame Law Students Win Moot Court Competition in Bologna

Notre Dame Law Students Win Moot Court Competition in Bologna

How should the law balance the principle of religious liberty with the principle of non-discrimination? With the support of the Nanovic Institute, second-year Notre Dame Law School students Megan Ball, Jackson Blais, Cristina Sanchez, and Lawrence Wesco traveled to Bologna, Italy to examine this question at the European Academy of...

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