Fall 2021 Courses

Students can use NOVO or class search to learn more and register for fall 2021 EURO courses.

1 Credit Courses

Europe in Context
  • Instructor: Anna Dolezal
  • Thursday 9:30-10:45 a.m.
  • EURO 30005 | CRN 18743

What do we mean when we talk about Europe? How is Europe defined culturally, geographically, and politically? How are Americans and American issues perceived by those across the Atlantic? If you are interested in these questions, or planning to study abroad in Europe, the Nanovic Institute for European studies invites you to enroll in their pre-study abroad course, “EURO 30005: Europe in Context. This one credit course features weekly guest lecturers from Notre Dame faculty as well as experts from Europe who will take students across the European continent through the course of the semester.

Learn More

European Theatre from Aeschylus to Beckett
  • Instructor: Julian Dean
  • Monday 9:25-10:15 a.m.
  • EURO 30009 | CRN 20848

From the fifth century BCE till the present day, the theatre in Europe has been an important site of artistic, political, and philosophical expression. This course will situate the great works of European theatre within their historical and aesthetic contexts to gain a clearer understanding of the relationship between the theatre and European history. Each week we will analyze one work which is representative of its time and place starting with Aeschylus in Ancient Greece and ending with the modernist masterpieces of Samuel Beckett in France. This course will progress chronologically and address major developments in European theatre from various national traditions treating them as texts and performances. We will read all texts in translation.

Learn More

How to Change the World? Collective Action for Social Justice
  • Instructor: Sehrazat Mart
  • Thursday 9:30-10:45 a.m.
  • EURO 30010 | CRN 20881 cross listed: IIPS 30104 | CRN 20881

This class aims to introduce how people, and especially the youth, mobilize to change the world. Through cases of collective action targeting issues of systemic racism, climate crisis, urban inequality, and gender violence in various European contexts, we will discuss how protesting can change the social world. In response to structural violence and the failure of existing institutions to provide peace and justice, we are witnessing waves of mobilization worldwide, including in Europe. While drawing on European cases, we will also discuss the transnational and comparative aspects of collective action. This class will provide students with a creative space to think about the role of collective action in building just societies.

Learn More

3 Credit Courses

Anthropology of Migration: Displacement, Borders, and Health
  • Instructor: Jelena Jankovic Rankovic
  • Tuesday & Thursday 9:30-10:45 a.m.
  • EURO 30304 | CRN 20509 cross listed ANTH 30304 | CRN 20511

Migration is a prevailing global phenomenon that affects millions of peoples around the world. According to the UNHCR report, at the end of 2019, there had been 79.5 million forcibly displaced people around the world. At the same time, refugees and migrants experience migration- and displacement-related physical and psychosocial stress and trauma, which may increase their vulnerability and affects their health and well-being. This course will explore, engage, and analyze contemporary migration flows - movements of people across national and international borders - and the ways human mobility shape refugees’ and migrants’ lived experiences, cultural meanings, social values, and health. How and why particular modes of mobility are permitted, encouraged, and enabled while others are conversely, banned, regulated, policed, and prevented? How do contemporary forms of displacement may challenge conventional understandings of who gets to be defined and accepted as a refugee? Why do we have so many different categories of people who simply seek refuge? Do these different categories indicate different treatments? How is migration associated with higher levels of mental health disorders among refugee/migrant populations? The course will engage with such questions by focusing on events that occurred in the second half of the twenty-first century in Europe, including both the EU and non-EU states. We will rely on the selected readings and documentaries as they reflect an integrative anthropological approach to migration, displacement, and refugees. Taking into account lived experiences, identity, social values, cultural meanings, health, and well-being, we will explore migration, borders, and displacement as a subjective experience and sites of ethical, socioeconomic, political, and cultural examinations and critiques. Topics will include transnational migration, terminology, citizenship, borders, asylum policy, health, and well-being. This course will also enrich your understanding of the fluidity of different categories, processes underlying refugees and migrants’ cultural and social tuning, as well as their biosocial responses, resilience, and adaptability under conditions of migration and displacement.

Learn More

Catholicism and Empire
  • Instructor: Sarah Shortall
  • Tuesday & Thursday 12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
  • EURO 33206 | CRN 19777 cross listed HIST 30557 | CRN 20859

This course explores the historical relationship between the Catholic Church and the rise and fall of European overseas empires since the sixteenth century. We will consider how Catholic missionaries both reinforced and resisted colonial power structures; how the Church made sense of racial, religious, and cultural differences in its efforts to evangelize colonial subjects; how African, Asian, and Latin American Catholics developed their own distinctive spiritual practices; and how Catholics in both Europe and its former colonies grappled with the challenge of decolonization and how to undo the legacies of colonialism within the Church itself. Readings will be drawn from a range of sources, including missionary diaries and manuals, memoirs, artwork, papal encyclicals, films, novels, works of theology, and historical scholarship.

Learn More

DC Seminar on Contemporary Europe
  • Instructor: William Collins Donahue
  • Monday 5:00-6:15 p.m.
  • EURO 33010 | CRN 21099
  • Graduate section: EURO 63010 | CRN 21169

A multi-disciplinary seminar focused on a selection of the most pressing challenges facing the European-American relationship today. The seminar includes a required week-long class residency in Washington DC during fall break to bring students into dialogue with experts in contemporary European and global affairs. Though the bulk of the course takes place during fall break, there will be weekly 1-hour class meetings before and after the break. This course counts toward the Transnational European Studies concentration in the Global Affairs (suppl.) major and toward the Minor in European Studies. Open to students from all years and majors. Departmental approval is required; the application for fall 2021 is closed.

Learn More

Envisioning Contemporary Europe: New Political Realities in Film, Literature, and Art
  • Instructor: Jim Collins
  • Tuesday & Thursday 12:30-1:45 p.m.
  • EURO 30302 | CRN 20418 cross listed: FTT 30302 | 20419

In this course, we’ll focus on some of the central concerns in contemporary European cultures: how to construct a meaningful sense of historical memory (and post-memory), how are gender and class struggles impacting national and increasingly transnational identities, and how can artists develop new forms of representation to depict those changes. In each unit we’ll compare how films, novels, television series, and conceptual art frame these issues, zeroing in on points of both commonality and divergence. We’ll also be incorporating films from the Nanovic Film Series at the Browning Cinema. (Some of the texts we’ll be discussing: Pawlikowski, Cold War, Tykwer, Babylon Berlin, Ferrante, My Brilliant Friend, Sorrentino, La Grande Bellezza, Donnersmarck, Never Look Away, Almodovar, Pain and Glory, Knausgaard, My Struggle: Book 2, Rohrwacher, Lazzardo Felice, Price, Borgen)

Learn More

European Politics
  • Instructor: Andy Gould
  • Tuesday & Thursday 9:30-10:45 a.m.
  • EURO 30201 | CRN 16610 cross-listed: POLS 30421 | CRN 14320
  • Graduate Section EURO 60201 | CRN 18262

In this course on European politics we will examine the literature on three major issues: regional integration, origins of modern political authority, and industrial political economy. We will seek to understand the origin, current functioning, and possible futures for key European institutions, including the EU, nation-states, social provision, unions, and political parties. Readings on the European Union, monetary politics, Germany, France, and Spain will be drawn from both scholarly sources and contemporary analyses of political events.

Learn More

German Colonialism and its Legacies
  • Instructor: Mark Kettler
  • Tuesday & Thursday 3:30-4:45 p.m.
  • EURO 30204 | CRN 20267 cross listed: HIST 30205 | CRN 20701, IIPS 30440 | CRN 21148

Bismarck once declared that, as long as he was Imperial Chancellor, Germany would not pursue a colonial policy. He was mistaken. Colonialism would fundamentally shape the German Empire as well as the diverse places and peoples it colonized. The legacies of colonial rule remain critically important today. Between 1884 and 1918, Germany would establish colonies in Togo, Cameroon, Southwest Africa, East Africa, China, and on islands across the Pacific. During this comparatively brief period, colonialism transformed both the German Empire and its overseas possessions in radical, often horrifically violent, ways. This course will examine why the German Empire embarked on a policy of colonial expansion, how Berlin laid claim to such vast territories far from Central Europe, and the complex ways in which German colonial states and colonized societies interacted with each other. It will examine how colonialism reshaped political structures, cultures, religions, economies, national identities, notions of race, and ideas about gender in both Germany and colonized societies. Finally, it will explore the profound legacies of colonialism that continue to shape Germany, its former colonies, and their contemporary relations.

Learn More

Life in the 19th Century European City: The Grimness and the Glory
  • Instructor: Alexander Martin
  • Monday & Wednesday 12:30-1:45 p.m.
  • EURO 30211 | CRN 19789 cross listed: HIST 30598 | CRN 19790

Urban civilization as we know it was born in 19th century Europe. Rarely have the bright and dark sides of progress been so starkly juxtaposed as in the cities immortalized by writers such as Charles Dickens, Victor Hugo, and Fyodor Dostoevsky, with their railroads, department stores, and other modern wonders, but also their slums, cholera, and ubiquitous coal smoke. Those cities were the first to confront the challenges that cities have faced ever since: How can a government unify the people, police the streets, and preserve a livable environment? How can society organize itself to build infrastructure, develop the economy, integrate immigrants, educate the young, and uplift the poor? How can everyday men and women enjoy the city’s wealth and freedom without becoming trapped by its cruelty and alienation? In this course, through modern scholarship and through fiction, journalism, images, and other sources from the period, we will explore the grimness and the glory of the 19th-century European city.

Learn More

Minor in European Studies Research Capstone Essay
  • Instructor: Clemens Sedmak
  • no regular meeting patern
  • EURO 48001 | CRN 17733

Research course for the capstone essay for the Minor in European Studies through the Nanovic Institute. Students conduct independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member of their choice for the capstone essay. May not be double-counted for thesis credit in a major field of study. Department approval is required before registration.

Learn More

MES Foundational Seminar: Tolerance and Toleration: Introduction to a European Discourse
  • Instructor: Clemens Sedmak
  • Tuesday & Thursday 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
  • EURO 33000 | CRN 21050

The UN Millennium Summit in September 2000 has explicitly recognized tolerance as a global value “Tolerance: Human beings must respect one other, in all their diversity of belief, culture, and language. Differences within and between societies should be neither feared nor repressed but cherished as a precious asset of humanity. A culture of peace and dialogue among all civilizations should be actively promoted." Important roots of this understanding of tolerance can be found in the history of Europe. Europe with its diversity of landscapes, political units, languages, and faith traditions had to negotiate peaceful coexistence in a particular way. Tolerance has been contested and promoted, conceptualized and violated, enacted and disrupted. The perspective of toleration allows for a particular way to understand Europe, its history, intellectual traditions, and its struggles. The course seeks to realize two objectives: a) to offer a systematic introduction to the (European) discourse on toleration and tolerance, and b) to offer an introduction to Europe and European Studies, centered around the idea of toleration. The course will work with historical milestones, conceptual debates, exemplary practices, and case studies. Departmental approval is required for this course. Interested students should contact the Institute’s DUS, Professor Hildegund Müller to request approval to enroll.

Learn More

Modern Germany Since 1871
  • Instructor: Mark Kettler
  • Tuesday & Thursday 2:00-3:15 p.m.
  • EURO 30203 | CRN 20270 cross listed: HIST 30465 | CRN 20268, GE 30465 | CRN 20269

This course examines modern Germany from national unification in 1871 to the recent unification of the two Germanies and beyond. We will investigate cultural, political, and social dimensions of Germany’s dynamic role in Europe and in the world. Topics include Bismarck and the founding of the Second Reich, World War I and the legacy of defeat, challenge and authority in the Weimar Republic, the National Socialist revolution, war and Holocaust, the collapse of the Third Reich, conflict and accommodation in East and West Germany, and unification and its aftermath. Class format will combine lectures with a discussion of readings from political, social, literary, and diplomatic sources.

Learn More

The World in Rome
  • Instructor: Maurizio Albahari
  • Monday & Wednesday 12:30-1:45 p.m.
  • EURO 20301 | CRN 21366 cross listed: ANTH 20323 | CRN 20525

This class aims to introduce how people, and especially the youth, mobilize to change the world. Through cases of collective action targeting issues of systemic racism, climate crisis, urban inequality, and gender violence in various European contexts, we will discuss how protesting can change the social world. In response to structural violence and the failure of existing institutions to provide peace and justice, we are witnessing waves of mobilization worldwide, including in Europe. While drawing on European cases, we will also discuss the transnational and comparative aspects of collective action. This class will provide students with a creative space to think about the role of collective action in building just societies.

Learn More

20th Century Russia: From Rasputin to Putin
  • Instructor: Semion Lyandres
  • Monday & Wednesday 2:00-2:50 p.m.
  • EURO 30207 | CRN 17381 cross listed: HIST 30355 | CRN 17380

This upper-division lecture course examines some of the most important events, ideas, and personalities that shaped late Imperial, Soviet, and early post-Soviet periods of Russian history during the last one hundred years: from the outbreak of the Russo-Japanese War and the Revolutions of 1905, WWI, and 1917 through the Great Terror of the 1930s, the experience of the Second World War and the emergence of the Soviet Empire, late Stalinism, the developed or mature socialism, the collapse of the communist regime and the disintegration of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, as well as Russia’s uneasy transition “out of Totalitarianism” and into Putin’s authoritarianism. The course is open to all students, including freshmen, with or without a background in modern Russian and European history.

Learn More