TES Approved Electives, Spring 2020

3-Credit Electives - Spring 2020

EURO 30203 - Modern Germany since 1871 (3 credits) - Mark T. Kettler

ROFR 30680 - Legacies of Revolution (3 credits) - Sonja Stojanovic

ROFR 40680 - Refugees and Migrants (3 credits) - Sonja Stojanovic

GE 30305 - Contemporary Germany (3 credits) - Maureen Gallagher

HIST 30355 - From Rasputin to Putin (3 credits) - Semion Lyandres

HIST 30469 - Russian Revolution at 100 (3 credits) - Semion Lyandres

HIST 30524 - Modern European Thought (3 credits) - Sarah Shortall

HIST 30996 - War in Modern History (3 credits) - Ian Johnson

HIST 43986 - A History of the Truth (3 credits) - Katlyn Carter

POLS 30242 - The Geopolitics of Energy (3 credits) - Rosemary Kelanic

POLS 30472 - Russian Politics (3 credits) - Susanne Wengle

POLS 30415 - The Rise and Fall of Democracies and Dictatorships (3 credits) - Scott Mainwaring

ROSP 30728 - Fascism in Spain (3 credits) - Pedro Aguilera-Mellado

1-credit Gateway Courses - Spring 2020

EURO 30001 - What is Europe? (1 credit) - Mark T. Kettler

EURO 30003 - Contesting the Idea of "Europe" (1 credit) - Nanovic Institute Graduate Fellows

EURO 30004 - Research Methods and Project Design Colloquium (1 credit) - Julie Tanaka, Erika Hosselkus, and Rachel Bohlmann

EURO 30102 - Europe Through Film (1 credit) - James Collins 

EURO 33205 - Europe Responds to the Migration Crisis (1.5 credits) - William Collins Donahue

3-credit Electives - Spring 2020 - Descriptions

EURO 30203 - Modern Germany since 1871 (3 credits) - Mark T. Kettler

This course examines modern Germany from national unification in 1871 to the recent unification of the two Germanies and beyond. We will investigate cultural, political, and social dimensions of Germany's dynamic role in Europe and in the world. Topics include Bismarck and the founding of the Second Reich, World War I and the legacy of defeat, challenge and authority in the Weimar Republic, the National Socialist revolution, war and Holocaust, collapse of the Third Reich, conflict and accommodation in East and West Germany, and unification and its aftermath. Class format will combine lectures with discussion of readings from political, social, literary, and diplomatic sources. 

ROFR 30680 - Legacies of Revolution (3 credits) - Sonja Stojanovic

From the sans-culottes of the French Revolution to the gilets jaunes (2018-....), this course will examine how the people of France have voiced their dissatisfaction with the status quo and with their leaders, and elicited lasting political and social changes. Drawing from historical sources, films, fiction, and art, we will track and analyze recurring themes and images of French unrest and resistance to societies of control from 1789 to the present. Assignments include an oral presentation, 2 short papers, and weekly readings of news articles. Taught in French. 

ROFR 40680 - Refugees and Migrants (3 credits) - Sonja Stojanovic

Calais. Lampedusa. Gibraltar. These places have become tragically synonymous with Europe's treatment of refugees and migrants. In this course, we will turn to recent texts and films to investigate the responses to the so-called "European migrant crisis." We will also consider the rise of nationalism and what it means for the future of the European Union. Assignments include 3 short papers (4-5 pages) and weekly readings of news articles. Taught in French. 

GE 30305 - Contemporary Germany (3 credits) - Maureen Gallagher

This course introduces students to the society, politics and culture of contemporary Germany. The main focus is on Germany after 1989, but we will contextualize our analysis by looking back as far as 1945 and by drawing comparisons to other German-speaking countries as well as the United States. Topics include social values and the German Basic Law, government and media, as well as issues currently in the news. We will also look at selected literary works, essays, and films in German in order to become familiar with fundamental techniques of interpretation. 

HIST 30355 - From Rasputin to Putin (3 credits) - Semion Lyandres

This upper division lecture course examines some of the most important events, ideas, and personalities that shaped late Imperial, Soviet, and early post-Soviet periods of Russian history during the last one hundred years: from the outbreak of the Russo-Japanese War and the Revolutions of 1905, WWI, and 1917 through the Great Terror of the 1930s, the experience of the Second World War and the emergence of the Soviet Empire, late Stalinism, the developed or mature socialism, the collapse of the communist regime and the disintegration of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, as well as Russia's uneasy transition "out of Totalitarianism" and into Putin's authoritarianism. The course is open to all students, including freshmen, with or without background in modern Russian and European history. 

HIST 30469 - Russian Revolution at 100 (3 credits) - Semion Lyandres

This lecture/discussion course explores how historical actors, writers, artists, filmmakers, and historians, over the last century, have portrayed and interpreted the 1917 revolution. We will also explore how the centenary of this defining event is being commemorated in Putin's Russia. 

HIST 30524 - Modern European Thought (3 credits) - Sarah Shortall

Since the eighteenth century, Europeans have grappled with a number of transformative events and developments, from the French Revolution and the birth of an industrial economy, to catastrophic wars and the rise and fall of European empires. In the process of making sense of these events, they produced works of philosophy, political theory, art, and literature that continue to shape the way we understand our place in the world today. This course introduces students to the history of European thought from the Enlightenment to the present, a period that birthed the many great "isms" that have defined the modern world: liberalism, socialism, nationalism, feminism, existentialism, totalitarianism, and colonialism. Course readings will be drawn from a range of primary sources, including novels, works of philosophy, political treatises, films, and works of art, as well as secondary sources by historians. By reading these two kinds of sources together, we will explore not only how ideas and works of art were shaped by the historical context in which they were produced, but also how they themselves shaped the course of European history. 

HIST 30996 - War in Modern History (3 credits) - Ian Johnson

This course will explore the evolution of war in modern history from the fall of Constantinople in 1453 through the present. Content will center upon the relationship between war, technology and society. Central themes will include the military revolution debate, the rise of western Europe, the military origins of modern state, and the challenge of technological change to stable international orders. Students will learn how the evolving conduct of war has shaped the structure of modern societies, and vice-versa. Individual class sessions will explore important moments of conflict and technological innovation. Some class sessions will center on paradigm-defining conflicts, such as the Thirty Years' War or the Second World War. The course will conclude with explorations of new themes in modern warfare, from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq to the rise of drone and cyber warfare. This course satisfies the university history requirement and is open to all students; no previous knowledge of the topic is required. 

HIST 43986 - A History of the Truth (3 credits) - Katlyn Carter

Recently, the truth has become controversial. Some scholars and commentators have even suggested that we are living in a "post-truth" era. In this discussion-based course, we will think historically about the truth and its opposites, including lies and false beliefs. Focused in the West (Europe and the United States), the course will proceed roughly chronologically from the invention of the printing press in the fifteenth century to the problem of propaganda in the twentieth century and culminating with our current "post-truth" era. Students will consider how our understanding of what is true has evolved over time in the realms of religion, science, the law, journalism, and politics. Readings will prepare students to ask questions such as: what counts as evidence? How do societies deal with bias and what does it mean to pursue objectivity? Does free speech lead to truth? How has technology changed the way humans think about the truth? Each week, students will read historical interpretations of truth at different moments as well as primary sources that touch on the truth in different spheres. The course will culminate in a discussion of the historian's role in producing truth. Course requirements include enthusiastic participation in class discussions and a final research paper, which will be completed and graded in steps over the course of the semester. 

POLS 30242 - The Geopolitics of Energy (3 credits) - Rosemary Kelanic

This course examines how oil and natural gas have shaped international relations from the early twentieth century to the present, with a particular focus on conflict. It begins by introducing students to the fundamentals of global energy production, consumption and trade, and then briefly surveys the political history of oil as it relates to the great powers. The course then moves on to contemporary issues, including the political significance of "fracking" technology, the role of the United States in protecting Persian Gulf oil, and the extent to which Russia's dominant natural gas position might translate into political influence in Europe. These and other topics are examined through numerous theoretical lenses, including theories of resource conflict, economic interdependence, political coercion, and petro-aggression. 

POLS 30472 - Russian Politics (3 credits) - Susanne Wengle

As a major global powers, Russia is an important country in world politics. With a history of multiple revolutions in one century, contemporary Russia is also a fascinating site to study political change. This course introduces students to Russian politics and fosters their understanding of the country's contemporary social, economic and political transformation and its recent history. Among other questions, we will discuss the challenges of the post-Soviet economic transformation (privatization, liberalization, energy-related issues, the rule of law, for example), the nature of the post-Soviet regimes (the type of democracy, authoritarian backsliding, for example) and Russia's changing relationship vis-a-vis the US, Europe and other CIS countries. While the class focuses on contemporary Russia, it will also engage with the post-Soviet transformation of other CIS countries, including Ukraine and Central Asia. In addition to the empirical developments, this course will engage students with theoretical debates in comparative politics and political economy, including theories on the role of institutions, interests and ideas in social and political change. No prior classes in comparative politics are necessary. Students who have taken Professor Javeline's or Professor Lyanders classes on Russia are encouraged to enroll; this class will follow up, not duplicate their content. 

POLS 30415 - The Rise and Fall of Democracies and Dictatorships (3 credits) - Scott Mainwaring

Winston Churchill famously said in a speech in the House of Commons in 1947, "Democracy is the worst form of government except for all those others that have been tried." For generations, social scientists have studied what makes democracy emerge and then survive or break down. And because some dictatorships have huge consequences for their own populations and the world, social scientists have also devoted considerable attention to analyzing the emergence, survival, and breakdown of authoritarian and totalitarian regimes. This course will examine these issues. The first part of the course will examine different theoretical approaches to understanding why democracies and dictatorships emerge and then survive or fall. The second and longer part will focus on the emergence, survival, and fall of democracies and dictatorships in Europe and Latin America, mostly in the 20th century. 

ROSP 30728 - Fascism in Spain (3 credits) - Pedro Aguilera-Mellado

Fascism as a political movement and ideology emerged in Europe in the 1920s and reached the peak of its power in the 1930s before its "official" institutional collapse in 1945. In Spain, its legacy survived longer than in any other European country as one of the foundations of General Franco???s prolonged dictatorship (1936-1975/78). This course will explore the history of fascism in Spain, from its roots in Spanish and European political developments in the 1920s and 30s to its rise to power under General Francisco Franco. It will also consider the mutations of fascism during the recent decades. We will try to define fascism in general and map its Spanish iterations as manifested in art, literature, photography, history, philosophy and film.The guiding questions of this class include but will not be limited to: what is fascism? what were the core ideas of the movement? What were its roots and who formed its social basis? How was an ideal society envisioned by Spanish fascists? What is the role of violence and power in fascist ideology? How did it reach the government? How did Franco's dictatorship transform society? What does fascism mean today? What are the remnants and/or mutations of Spain's fascism today? Taught in Spanish. 

1-Credit Gateway Courses - Spring 2020 - Descriptions

EURO 30001 - What is Europe? (1 credit) - Mark T. Kettler

What is Europe? Is it merely a geographical expression? If so, what are its parameters? Shall we instead define Europe as a cultural community? A unique economic zone? A set of common intellectual traditions? Recent clashes over "European" identity and competing visions of Europe's political and economic future have underscored the urgent relevance of this basic question. This one credit seminar and lecture series will introduce students to ways in which past actors have attempted to define Europe. Invited scholars from disciplines like Political Science, Economics, History, Anthropology, and Architecture will showcase how they grapple with what it means to be "European," what distinguishes Europe from the rest of the globe, and what connects it. These new perspectives will illuminate current debates over national identity and cultural diversity, democracy and its challengers, and other issues of contemporary importance. This course is a gateway to the European Studies concentration within the Global Affairs (Suppl.) major in the Keough School, but students from all majors and Colleges are welcome. 

EURO 30003 - Contesting the Idea of "Europe" (1 credit) - Nanovic Institute Graduate Fellows

The idea and identity of Europe as a geographical, political, and sociocultural unit has come under intense scrutiny in the opening decades of the twenty-first century. From the polarizing position of Post-Soviet Russia to the unfolding drama of Brexit and from the renascent tide of popular nationalisms to the ongoing immigration "crisis" across the continent, the face of Europe as we know it today is changing at an unprecedented and even alarming rate. Drawing on insights from a variety of disciplines - including history, literature, law, and international relations - this 1-credit seminar will engage different perspectives on what "Europe" means as a historical category, the consequences of contemporary socio- and geopolitical developments for this notion, and what the future of "Europe" as a concept may be. Centrally, this seminar will link these discussions with some of the most pressing contemporary European policy debates on nationalism and populism, immigration, the role of religion(s) in secular societies, and the future of the European Union while seeking to ground these issues in a longue durée understanding of European history and culture. 

EURO 30004 - Research Methods and Project Design Colloquium (1 credit) - Julie Tanaka, Erika Hosselkus, and Rachel Bohlmann 

(Note that this class meets in the second half of the semester only, beginning 3/16)

How can students best prepare to design a research project and undertake research abroad in an archive or special collections repository? What skills are necessary to locate appropriate source material and assess data quality? What is involved in qualitative data analysis? What makes a research grant proposal competitive? These are some of the questions this introductory, team-taught course will address. Working with curators and archivists from the Hesburgh Libraries' Rare Books and Special Collections department and Navari Family Center for Digital Scholarship, students will learn how to design successful research projects, conduct archival research, and identify the information that will facilitate writing competitive grant applications. A significant portion of this course will engage students in a hands-on practicum examining a variety of original documents to gain the foundational skills necessary to prepare for and conduct research abroad. 

EURO 30102 - Europe Through Film (1 credit) - James Collins 

What can we learn about Europe by exploring its cinema? Based on an extended version of the Institute's film series each semester, the content of this course will focus on the relationship between contemporary European cinema and the European ideas and realities it finds compelling in terms of social and imaginative power. The course will include some history of cinema, but emphasis will be laid on using cinema as a way of stimulating questions about the nature of Europe today. Open to students of all years and majors. 

EURO 33205 - Europe Responds to the Migration Crisis (1.5 credits) - William Collins Donahue

(Includes pre-semester travel to Berlin, January 4-11)

This course will provide an opportunity for students and faculty to explore various aspects of Germany's current policies toward refugees and immigrants. It includes a one-week trip to Berlin prior to the start of the semester. In Berlin, the group will meet with federal, state and local governmental officials, civil society groups, and representatives of international organizations. The issues to be explored include: Germany's policies toward asylum-seekers, the relationship between these policies and the European Union, policies to integrate refugees and migrants into German society, and the political impact of these policies. The on-site Berlin seminar is designed to assess the efficacy of current policies, and identify best policy practices going forward. Includes two pre-departure sessions (one planning session, one webinar), and 5-7 follow-up sessions during the first half of the semester, culminating in a poster exhibit to disseminate our findings.