Graduate Fellows

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Nanovic Graduate Fellows conduct interdisciplinary research, add to the EURO curriculum, and engage with the broader academic community

The Institute has developed a new program to bring graduate students in European studies more closely into its life and operation. A complementary cohort to the graduate students who have won dissertation completion fellowships, these younger graduate fellows are already closely involved in several exciting new initiatives. 

Sarah Crane

Sarah Crane

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Sarah Crane is a Ph.D. student in the Department of History and the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Her work focuses on legal responses to the Holocaust, examining how two trials, the Frankfurt-Auschwitz Trial in Frankfurt and the trial of Adolf Eichmann in Israel, challenge conventional understandings of the relationship between law, democracy, and the Nazi legacy in the decades following the end of WWII. 

Julian Dean

Julian Dean

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Julian Dean is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English at the University of Notre Dame. His work focuses on Irish drama from the mid-eighteenth century to the present and how representations on the stage helped to shape notions of a national identity in the wake of English colonization.

 

Moritz S. Graefrath

Moritz S. Graefrath

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Moritz S. Graefrath is a Ph.D. student in political science. Broadly speaking, his research interests include international relations theory, diplomatic history, and foreign policy analysis with a particular focus on Europe since 1919. His dissertation seeks to illuminate the role of power vacuums in international politics by answering a series of foundational questions: what are power vacuums? Why do states compete for control over some but not others? And what accounts for variation in the types of strategies they employ?

Sehrazat Gulsum

Sehrazat Gulsum

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Sehrazat Gulsum is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology and Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Her primary research interest lies in the socio-political forces and conditions that facilitate or obstruct participatory and deliberative urban governance and the role of urban movements in shaping the city.  

Alec Hahus

Alec Hahus

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Alec Hahus is a Ph.D. student in political science, specializing in international relations. His research interests include international relations theory, international political economy, and security relations between the US, EU, Russia, and China. He also has an interest in studying religion, nationalism, and identity in politics and violence.

Spencer T. B. Hunt

Spencer T. B. Hunt

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Spencer T. B. Hunt is a Ph.D. candidate in Medieval Studies with Notre Dame's Medieval Institute. Spencer’s research interests include interreligious relations throughout the medieval Mediterranean with special focus on Christian-Muslim interactions in Medieval Spain.

Valeria Mora-Hernández

Valeria Mora-Hernández

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Valeria Mora-Hernández is a Ph.D. Candidate in Spanish. Her doctoral dissertation focuses on the connections between violence and the process of constructing self-identity in texts by authors such as Cervantes, Zayas and Quevedo. Her research is a response, an attempt to understand violence in contemporary Spain by looking at its past through the representations of violence and identity in Early Modern Spanish Literature.

Clare O'Hare

Clare O'Hare

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Clare O’Hare works at the intersection of comparative politics and international political economy. She is especially interested legal pluralism. Current projects examine the role of corporate lawyers and multinational corporations in the diffusion of English common law institutional structures to civil law jurisdictions in Europe.

Vincent L. Strand, SJ

Vincent L. Strand, SJ

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Vincent L. Strand, SJ, is a Ph.D. student in systematic theology. He specializes in the theology of grace, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century theology. His current research focuses on the German Catholic theologian Matthias Joseph Scheeben (1835–1888) and on the intersection of the theology of grace and church-state relations.