Graduate Fellows

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The Institute has developed a new program to bring graduate students in European studies more closely into its life and operation. A complementary cohort to the graduate students who have won dissertation completion fellowships, these younger graduate fellows are already closely involved in several exciting new initiatives. 

Shinjini Chattopadhyay

Shinjini Chattopadhyay

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

A Ph.D. student in the department of English, Shinjini Chattopadhyay intends to explore how the urban texture is constructed in the works of James Joyce. She wishes to conduct a genetic study of the avant-textes of Joyce to understand how Joyce in his texts incorporates multiple urban fabrics within the overarching presence of the Hibernian metropolis.

Jake Coen

Jake Coen

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Jake Coen studies violence and political rhetoric. His dissertation research focuses primarily on the concept of tyranny in ninth- and tenth-century France and Germany, though he is also interested in working with vernacular literary and legal traditions across Europe.

Moritz S. Graefrath

Moritz S. Graefrath

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Moritz S. Graefrath is a Ph.D. student in political science. He specializes in international relations. Broadly speaking, his research interests include international relations theory, security studies, and grand strategy with a particular regional focus on western Europe.

Alec Hahus

Alec Hahus

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Alec studies religion in identity politics, and religion and violence.

Clare O'Hare

Clare O'Hare

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Clare O’Hare works at the intersection of comparative politics and international political economy. She is especially interested legal pluralism. Current projects examine the role of corporate lawyers and multinational corporations in the diffusion of English common law institutional structures to civil law jurisdictions in Europe.

Anna Vincenzi

Anna Vincenzi

Nanovic Graduate Fellow

Numerous populist movements currently gaining popularity across Europe and challenging the EU’s existence. Anna's research looks at a time when Europe was at a similar crossroad, the Age of Revolution (1765-1848). How could the inequalities of the Old Regime be solved? How could sovereignty be put in the people? How to pursue social and political change? These were crucial questions for peoples across Europe in the eighteenth century and remain crucial questions for European democracies today.